New Ireland

The waters surrounding Kavieng has a wreck, opportunities for reef and drift diving as well as caves and plenty of pelagics

Kavieng
Located on the northwest tip of New Ireland, this dive site has a huge variety of marine life. It is best known for big species such as grey reef sharks, and semi-pelagic fish like dog-tooth tunas, Spanish mackerels, mobula rays, eagle rays and barracudas. There are also wonderful pristine coral gardens, sponges and fans and many different species of nudibranchs.

Albatross Passage
Albatross Passage is a narrow channel which separates two islands. Eagle rays, mobulas and manta rays are here in abundance as well as grey reef sharks, barracudas, and large dogtooth tunas. At the northern end of the passage is a ridge covered in beautiful soft corals where a variety of smaller reef species can be found, including leaf scorpionfish and pygmy seahorses.

Ecucha Patch
Large schools of barracudas and trevallies are almost always present here as well as tuna and different species of sharks. On the north of the ridge there is wreck of a fishing boat which is home to huge groupers.

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Plane wreck at Kavieng (photo by Joe of Sub Aquatics)
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Plane wreck at Kavieng (photo by Joe of Sub Aquatics)
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Kavieng (photo by Clement Bourse)
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Kavieng (photo by Fred Hamblen)
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